Episode 140: Jupiter Ascending

This week, Gavia and Morgan dive into the Wachwoski's underappreciated, instant cult classic Jupiter Ascending. They discuss the film's extraordinary production and costume design, its fairy tale tropes, its initial critical drubbing, and why it may just feature Eddie Redmayne's best performance yet.

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Episode 138: Rock of Ages

This week, Morgan and Gavia break down the 2012 film adaptation of the hit Broadway musical Rock of Ages. They compare the film to other jukebox musicals, assess its box office performance, and — most importantly — discuss what the hell is going on with Tom Cruise.

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Episode 137: Elizabeth Gaskell's "North and South"

This week, Morgan and Gavia cap off the podcast's summer book club with a discussion of Elizabeth Gaskell's Victorian romance North and South. They compare the novel to other nineteenth century marriage novels and evaluate its depiction of the industrial revolution and overwrought male emotions.

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Episode 136: The Babadook

This week, Gavia and Morgan discuss Jennifer Kent's cult horror film The Babadook (2014). They consider the merits of watching horror at the cinema and at home, compare this film's family drama structure to "Hereditary," and explain the origin of one of the internet's most inexplicable memes.

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Episode 132: Todd Haynes' "Carol"

This week, Gavia and Morgan revisit Todd Haynes' instant classic 2015 film Carol. They discuss the film's references to photography and classic film, contextualize it within Todd Haynes' wider filmography and recent queer cinema, and debate the lead performances by Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara.

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Episode 130: X-Men: Dark Phoenix

This week, Gavia and Morgan commiserate over the X-Men franchise's last gasp, X-Men: Dark Phoenix. They bemoan filmmaker Simon Kinberg's incompetent direction, marvel at the film's incomprehensible plot, reminisce about happier times, and wonder where it all went wrong.

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Episode 127: Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein"

This week, Gavia and Morgan convene their first book club of the year to discuss Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein, first published in 1818. Topics include Shelley's storied personal history, the novel's themes of parenthood and colonialism, and its long legacy of dramatic and cinematic adaptations.

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Episode 126: High Life

This week, Morgan and Gavia discuss Claire Denis' unnerving new science fiction film, High Life, starring Robert Pattinson and Juliette Binoche. They discuss Denis and Pattinson's collaboration, the film's unusual relationship with the space movie canon, and the existential terror of existence.

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Episode 125: Snowpiercer

This week, to celebrate its arrival on UK Netflix, Gavia and Morgan revisit one of 2014's best films, Bong Joon-ho's dystopian thriller Snowpiercer. They dissect its allegorical approach to capitalism, its effective use of Chris Evans and Tilda Swinton, its stupendous production design, and its troubled history as one of the Weinstein Company's last significant releases.

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Episode 123: The Road to El Dorado

This week, Morgan and Gavia revisit a classic of early-aughts animation: early DreamWorks animation feature The Road to El Dorado. They compare the film to newer animated fare, consider its depiction of colonization, and reminisce about its status as a slashfic ur-text for many millennials of a certain age. A Patreon-sponsored episode.

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Episode 122: 10 Things I Hate About You

This week, Gavia and Morgan celebrate the 20th anniversary of classic teen movie (and Shakespeare adaptation) 10 Things I Hate About You. They compare it to its source text, The Taming of the Shrew, as well as to other teen movies of the era, consider its feisty heroine in the context of third-wave feminism, and reflect on Heath Ledger's astonishing performance and sadly abbreviated career.

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Episode 121: Marvel's Captain America: The Winter Soldier

This week, Gavia and Morgan celebrate the fifth anniversary of one of Marvel's best films and their own personal favorite, Captain America: The Winter Soldier. They dissect its political commentary, its sensitive treatment of its central characters, assess its place in the larger MCU, and reminisce about the glory days of Captain America fandom c. spring 2014.

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